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WIC is a short-term program shown to improve health outcomes in babies, including improving birth weights and reducing infant mortality rates, as well as stronger outcomes for moms in managing weight gain in pregnancy, prolonging breastfeeding duration, and helping moms access breastfeeding support and pumping support as they return to work or school. WIC is hugely cost effective and strengthens both our local and national economy.

In 2013 alone, $6.3 billion of WIC food benefits were spent in local communities across the country. WIC is far-reaching, serving over 8 million mothers and young children per month, including 53% of all infants and approximately one out of five pregnant women in the U.S.

These families obtain vital nutrition assistance and counseling, health and social service referrals, and breastfeeding support through WIC offices throughout the country, including on military bases.

 

Yet, programs like WIC are at risk to make tax cuts for large corporations. Parents across the country aren’t going to stand for this nonsense. We asked for your stories on how these programs help your family and thousands of you responded.  Here are some of the stories you have sent us! Want to share how SNAP, Medicaid, WIC, and/or Head Start has impacted your family? Share your story with us today!

Heather from Pennsylvania,

"When my children and I fled domestic violence for a better life in another state, it was hard. We were broke, and my children were hungry. I managed to get a low-paying job at Starbucks, and we qualified for SNAP benefits, but my children were still going to bed with rumbling bellies.

There is nothing more heartbreaking than telling your toddlers that they cannot have anything else to eat..Bbecause we were out of food. WIC helped us get the extra nourishment my children needed so that they didn't have to go to bed hungry. I love my WIC clinic, and the staff is always kind and compassionate. They helped me put my children on CHIPS, so that they had health coverage.

To a scared and hungry family, WIC meant that we had a fighting chance to make a new life for ourselves."

Andrea from Colorado,

“Our family depended on WIC with each of our five kids. My husband was active duty military and I had high-risk pregnancies with all of our kids, so I couldn't work. Sometimes, WIC was all we had to eat. I can only imagine that there are families in the exact same circumstances.”

Miquela from California,

“The WIC program helped me when I had my son. Even before I had him the breastfeeding class they offered was the only place I got information on nursing. If it wasn't for the items I got from WIC after my son was born I don't know what I would have done. My husband made too much for us to be on full government assistance, but we were low enough income to qualify for the WIC program. My son is a healthy 21 year old now and to this day I appreciate the help the government gave me at a very difficult time in our life. Please do not discontinue this amazing service. It would only hurt innocent children.”

Robi from Tennessee,

“If it had not been for WIC, many years ago when my first child was born, I don't know how I would have possibly been able to afford to feed her. Being a single Mmother at the time and working barely above minimum wage, there wasn't money leftover after rent and utilities were paid. My circumstances thankfully changed after a couple of years and I didn't have to use WIC when my second child was born. This is a vitally important program for wWomen and cChildren.”

Beverly from Ohio,

“WIC was vital when I was pregnant and after I had my five sons. I had a pPreemie and if it weren't for WIC, I would not have been able to afford the sSpecial mMilk to help my son become the mMan he is today. WIC let's you know if your iIron levels are low and they offer nutritional foods for mMothers and their cChildren. I breastfedBreastfed all my sons.”


The views and opinions expressed in this post are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect those of MomsRising.org

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