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Breastfeeding is the most natural thing in the world. But that doesn't always mean that it's easy or that there's no learning curve. Many mothers need a lot of support from friends, family and employers to start and continue breastfeeding exclusively for at least 6 months as recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics, and to keep breastfeeding (and/or pumping) for at least a year. Today, most new mothers don't have the support they have had in the past from mothers, aunts and grandmothers who could help them get started and weather any bumps in the road.  At the same time, we face new challenges as the majority of mothers with infants work outside of the home.

Recognizing that nursing mothers need support from as many sources as possible, the Surgeon General Regina Benjamin's recent "Call to Action" on Breastfeeding specifically called on all sectors of society to do what they can.  In announcing the "Call to Action," Dr. Benjamin said: “Many barriers exist for mothers who want to breastfeed. They shouldn’t have to go it alone. Whether you’re a clinician, a family member, a friend, or an employer, you can play an important part in helping mothers who want to breastfeed.”

The blogposts below each answer the Surgeon General's call in some way, highlighting what you and others can do to support breastfeeding!

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No Politics in the Lactation Room, Bill Bentley, Voices for America's Children

Lactation Policies - Take Action Today!, Genevieve Colvin, BreastfeedLA

Celebrating World Breastfeeding Week: A Time to Engage Employers in the Breastfeeding Dialogue, Steve Wing, Corporate Voices for Working Families

Breastfeeding: A Secret Weapon to Save Billions of Dollars, Mary Olivella, MomsRising.org

Coming Soon, Let's Hope: Breastfeeding Support Anyone Could Afford, Melissa Bartick, MD

Breastfeeding: An Effective Tool to Prevent Obesity, Elizabeth Brotherton

5 Things Employers Should Know About Breastfeeding, Katrina Alcorn

Breastfeeding- Making It Work, Vibhuti Mehra, Labor Project for Working Families

Celebrating African-American Moms and Breastfeeding, Bettina Forbes, Best for Babes

Good Day for Breastfeeding: Breastfeeding Expenses Get Covered Without Co-Pay, Melanie Ross-Levin, National Women's Law Center

Breastfeeding Essentials, Janelle Sorensen, Healthy Child Healthy World

The Importance of Breastfeeding from a Pediatrician's Perspective, Sahira Long, MD

Galacta-what? (Recipe for lactating moms!), Debbie Koenig, Words to Eat By, Parents Need to Eat Too

What Does Support Look Like? What to do and not to do to support a breastfeeding mother, Annie, PhD in Parenting

The Good, The Bad and The Hope for Breastfeeding Rights, Vicki Shabo, National Partnership for Women and Families

Serving Up Some Shut Up Juice, Erika Chavez

The Real Trouble With Breast Milk Baby, Susan Linn, Campaign for a Commercial Free Childhood

California Hospital Infant Feeding Policy-An Important First Step, Karen Farley, RD, IBCLC

CDC Vital Signs - Hospital Support for Breastfeeding: Preventing Obesity Begins in Hospitals

More Breastfeeding Support Needed in Hospitals, Michelle Brandt, Stanford SCOPE blog

This Sucks: Breast Pumping at Work, Katrina Alcorn

Learning and Teaching the Art of Breastfeeding, Jesse Zilberstein, MPA, IBCLC

Breastfeeding - It Takes a Village!, Laurie True, California WIC

Putting Together the Pieces of the Puzzle: The Landscape of Breastfeeding Support, Megan Renner, US Breastfeeding Committee

Letter on Breastfeeding to Expectant Parents from Jane Morton, MD (with links to terrific videos)

Sobre La Lactancia Materna:
"Semana Mundial de Lactancia Materna 2011", Mother's Utopia

"Lactancia materna, le mejor opción", Todo Bebé

"Como Amamantar a Su Bebé", Nacer Sano

When Breastfeeding Doesn't Come Easy, Saray Hill, IBCLC

Coulda, Woulda, Shoulda, Gloria Riesgo

Lack of Support a Real Hindrance to Nursing Mothers, Elisa Batista


The views and opinions expressed in this post are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect those of MomsRising.org

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