Kristin Rowe-Finkbeiner

    What does health reform look like to you?

    Posted May 21st, 2009 by

    We’re telling legislators to get real healthcare reform done immediately, and get it right for kids and families. But we want to know what that means to you! Let us know what it would take for health reform to be meaningful for your family.

    Also, if you or your family has a healthcare story to share, tell us about it here! We’re collecting personal healthcare stories of all kinds to help educate legislators about the critical importance of affordable health coverage for everyone.

    Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
    * * * * *
    Posted Under: H: Health Care
    Permalink

    454 Comments

    May 21, 2009 at 10:43 am by Anonymous

    I am covered under my husband but after a 25 year career myself I have been forced to quit myself due to health concerns including cancers. If we were ever to get a divorce, not that we are even considering one, but I would never qualify for affordable health care on my own again. This really scares me. Or what if he were to lose his job? I am unable to work full time and definitely uninsureable.

    [Reply]

    May 21, 2009 at 10:42 am by Beth C

    Health care reform needs to include the concept of a Single Payer Plan, since administrative costs of insurance providers can be up to 50% of the total cost of medical care. Medicare administrative expense is only 5%. We need to look at other countries who have single payer plans, glean what we like about them, look at what would not work well here, and form an American single payer system that will give health care to all of us.

    [Reply]

    May 21, 2009 at 10:42 am by Marlene

    I have Multiple Sclerosis – a degenerative diseases in which the immune system eats away the myelin that coats the nerves in the brain and spine. There is no cure yet, and the medicine to slow the progression is a staggering $4,000+ a month. I have to keep working to have insurance even though it is expediting my downhill spiral. BTW, there is nothing anyone does or does not do that causes them to have MS. It usually strikes people in their 20′s to 30′s, and not diagnosed quickly enough to start treatment soon enough. If diagnosed while not covered by insurance, that person will forever be classified as ‘not insurable’ due to ‘prior condition’. None of this is fair to someone already beset by such a horrible disease!!!

    [Reply]

    May 21, 2009 at 10:41 am by Liane Olsan

    It’s time all Americans had a comprehensive health care plan. The time for reform is now. Please keep the health interests of your constituents, not special interest groups, guide your vote. All citizens should have the same health care benefits that you do.

    [Reply]

    May 21, 2009 at 10:41 am by Katie

    My husband has a kidney disease and has only one option for health insurance, the state pool, which costs $600/ mo. My employer requires that we get our own health insurance, which puts me on the general market as an individual, not part of a group. My ONLY option for any health insurance that covers maternity (I want to have another child one day) costs $600/ mo. (this is discriminatory against women). Our healthy 2-yr-old costs $100/mo. So for our little family of 3, we pay $1300/ mo in health insurance. This is more than our rent and WAY more than we can afford (my husband is a student).

    The health insurance companies have us all in a headlock and they are laughing all the way to the bank. Give ‘em hell Obama!

    [Reply]

    May 21, 2009 at 10:39 am by jj morehouse

    It’s time to get it RIGHT!!!!

    [Reply]

    May 21, 2009 at 10:39 am by Christine

    Why is it that all of the people in Congress think that it’s best to take from the low income people. Everyone in Congress has an income that it would take 4 low income peoples wages that one congress person makes a year. So why is it that we have to be the ones to have our hard earn money taken from us?

    [Reply]

    May 21, 2009 at 10:39 am by maryb

    I am a single mother who is self-employed. I pay health insurance through an association for self-employed people. This insurance is sick-insurance, it is there in case something big happens to me or my son. It is not cheap. I pay $20 copays, my deductible is huge and it never covers well-care or preventive medical visits, they are out of pocket and expensive. I feel like I am paying for nothing every month. I take my son to the doctor, I do not go for myself because it is too expensive and not covered. Why are politicians afraid to fix this?

    [Reply]

    May 21, 2009 at 10:38 am by Julie Gengo

    Options for natural, preventative wellness care that has results. 98% of cancer is preventable and so is heart disease. I want to have the options of treating myself with non-invasive therapies and natural supplements for any illness or condition. Preventative guidance is essential for a prosperous, healthy nation.

    [Reply]

    May 21, 2009 at 10:38 am by Christa Miller

    My husband quit his job recently so we could move to a state with a lower cost of living. I self-employed full-time, but still cannot afford health insurance for our family of 4 (or even our 2 kids). I feel we were caught between a rock and a hard place — a job with health insurance in a state we couldn’t afford, or a state we can afford but no health insurance. It doesn’t seem that Americans should have limited choices about where and how to work based on healthcare.

    [Reply]

    Trackbacks

    1. Moms commenting on health care reform « Raising Women’s Voices

    Leave a Comment

    Your name is required
    An Email address is required

    Notify me of follow-up comments via e-mail