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Working families need YOU on Capitol Hill June 24th!!

June 11, 2014
On Monday, June 23rd, MomsRising members from across the country are coming to Washington, D.C. to deliver kites to the President on how our families need a lift because outdated Mad Men-era, work place policies are hurting our families and our nation’s economic security.
Elyssa Koidin's picture
Take Crafty Action!

Let's Fly a Kite for Working Families!

June 9, 2014
Would you gather some friends (or even gather just your kids or grandkids) and draw on a paper kite that we can send to President Obama (and deliver to Congress too!)?
Ruth Martin's picture

Being a Low-Income Mother; Then and Now

May 6, 2014
In 1996, Bill Clinton officially announced that motherhood was not work. He did this through his Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act . This legislation stated that people could no longer receive benefits unless they fulfilled 30 hours per week of out-of-home work requirements. Clinton said this would “end welfare as we know it.” And it did. Since 1996, the number of families with children living in extreme poverty ($2 a day or less) has increased by nearly 130% . When I started interviewing mothers for Gross Domestic Product , I focused on mothers who were receiving, or had at...

Valuing America's working families: A Blog Carnival on Powering the Engine of America's Economic Growth

April 7, 2014
Our country's greatness was built on valuing America's working families. At MomsRising and Progressive States Network, we believe that in America, more families should be joining a thriving middle class than falling out of it -- powering the engine of America's economic growth and national prosperity in the process. But our workplace standards are woefully out of date, and women and their families bear the brunt of it. Women's wages in the U.S. are stuck at 77 cents to a man's dollar for full-time year round work, with mothers and women of color experiencing a gap that's larger still. The U.S...

Gross Domestic Product - What if you got paid to raise your children?

April 4, 2014
The idea to write a play about motherhood came to me when I was writing my last play, Flipside and nursing my second child. Actually, it had been gestating since the day I was nursing my first child and complaining to my HartBeat Co-Artistic Director Greg Tate that the intersecting struggles of child care, career and being broke were making motherhood feel impossible. To this my wise friend said, "Well that's what's behind the movement for counting childrearing as part of the Gross Domestic Product. Think about how much easier this would all be if raising children was valued for what it is -...

"Great" Alternatives To #PaidSickDays

March 27, 2014
Kids are gross. Inspiring, cuddly, lovable, yes - but also: gross. I had barely heard of things like pink eye, ringworm and foot and mouth disease until I became a mom. My kid even got scarlet fever - Oregon Trail much? All kids get sick sometime, but nothing makes a 2 am vomit session worse than the additional worry that you’ll lose your job if you can’t go in to work the next day. Unfortunately, that nightmare is a reality for far too many people in the United States. In fact, today, 40% of all workers and 80% of low-wage workers cannot earn even a single paid sick day to care for...
Charlie Rose's picture

Brigid Schulte is Overwhelmed - and So Are You! Part One

March 10, 2014
Author Brigid Schulte has a job, a house, a husband, several children, and a whole lot of stress. She's also just written a book, available online and at your favorite bookstore, called Overwhelmed: Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time , about how we've taken on way more than we can handle, what it's doing to our lives and our families, and how we can learn to live differently. She graciously made time for my questions, both here and in my next post on this blog. Do fathers and mothers experience overwhelm differently? Absolutely! Right now, mothers are still doing twice the...
Valerie Young's picture

76% of Food Service Workers Lack Access to Paid Sick Days

March 4, 2014
Hispanic Workers are the Least Likely to Have Access New analysis by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) finds that access to paid sick days is unequally distributed across the U.S. population, with substantial differences by race/ethnicity, occupation, earnings, and employment status. Analyzing the National Health Interview Survey, IWPR found that 61 percent of private sector employees had access to paid sick days in 2012, up from 57 percent in 2009; yet, 41 million workers still lack access. Lack of paid sick days is especially common in certain jobs requiring frequent contact...
Jennifer Clark's picture

Rep. DeLauro for #DoubleBooked: It's Time for Paid Leave

February 20, 2014
Rep. Rosa DeLauro represents the Third District of Connecticut and serves as Senior Democrat on the Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations Subcommittee. She has been cancer-free for 28 years. In 1986, I received news that no woman wants to hear: I had ovarian cancer. Fortunately, my doctors had discovered it by chance at its earliest stage. But to beat the disease, I would have to undergo treatment for several months. At the time, I was Chief of Staff to Senator Chris Dodd – a tough but rewarding job with long days and not much down time. When I told him about my...
Rachel Laser's picture

Anticipation: Snow Day and Fair Workplace Policies

February 5, 2014
What a difference a day makes! Tuesday, Jan. 28, was filled with joyful anticipation and dread as kids and parents in North Carolina prepared for the arrival of snow. Parents planned for daycare, food and stocked up on firewood and batteries, while children dreamed of snowmen, sledding and a glorious day off from school. Delivery came in the form of several inches of fine, fluffy stuff, which while not good for making snowballs or snowmen, is perfect to play in. Jan. 28 also delivered new possibilities for parents: the hope for a better future for their families. In his State of the Union...
Odile Fredericks's picture

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