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International Women’s Day: Miles to Walk, in the US and Across the Seas

March 8, 2011
2011 marks the 100th anniversary of International Women's Day – a day for the celebration of women worldwide. In 25 nations (including China, Afghanistan, Russia, Ukraine, Vietnam and Zambia), the day has become a national holiday, a time not only to cheer for women's advances, but also to reflect upon the many global inequalities women still face. We honor this day in the United States, too, and stand in solidarity with our sisters who are struggling to surmount injustice around the globe. But here at the Ms. Foundation, we know we must do more than look outward at the failures and fault-...

Injustice dismantled: Welcome to a new world aborning

February 26, 2011
Fair-minded folks breathed sighs of relief and gratitude when President Barack Obama and Attorney General Eric Holder announced that the shamefully discriminatory Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) will not be defended by the U.S. Department of Justice. At last, the Department of Justice lives up to its name by embracing lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGBT) people! At last, President Obama takes a strong stand against marriage discrimination! While our president evolves his thinking on the issue of marriage equality for same-sex couples, the world spins forward. The administration’s action builds...

How to Save Multiculturalism

February 24, 2011
European leaders say 'multiculturalism is a failure.' Their brand of multiculturalism preserved distinctions without building cohesion and unity. Americans must be vigilant this doesn't happen here, and we can start by taking small steps in our own lives while advocating for smarter policies that create a brighter, more inclusive, united future.
Homa Tavangar's picture

Immigrants Need the Violence Against Women Act- Let's Stop Blaming the Victims

February 12, 2011
When I listened to the testimony yesterday of Ms. Antonia Peña, a domestic worker who volunteers at Casa de Maryland, I heard a story I've heard many times that never fails to affect me. Her friend Maria, who was born in El Salvador and has a two-year-old daughter, was in an abusive relationship. Because of her immigration status, coming forward led to legal retaliation against her. In her case, and in those of countless other women across the country, the law existed not to protect her but to protect her abuser. She was literally trapped in her own family and her own home. The status quo...
Congressman Raul Grijalva's picture

Delayed Justice for Guatemalan Mother Encarnación Bail Romero

February 4, 2011
In 2007, Encarnación Bail Romero, a young woman from Guatemala, was arrested and detained during an immigration raid at the Missouri poultry processing plant where she worked. The fact that Encarnación was a mother with a baby at home did not matter. She was detained without the opportunity to make care arrangements for her son, Carlos—a U.S. citizen—who was just six months old. While in detention, Encarnación was not allowed to participate in her custody case and consequently, her parental rights were terminated. Carlos was adopted by a couple soon after. This week, the Missouri Supreme...

Equal Protection for Unmarried Fathers

November 10, 2010
by Marcia D. Greenberger , Co-President, National Women's Law Center We all recognize the stereotype of the unmarried father--absent, uninterested, and uninvolved in his kids' lives. But the cliché that unmarried fathers never have meaningful relationships with their children--just because they aren't married to their children's mother--has never been true across the board, and today in 2010, it's less accurate than ever. That's why it's of such concern that federal immigration law setting U.S. citizenship rules for children born abroad imposes tougher standards for children born to unmarried...
Thao Nguyen's picture

Why I Support the DREAM Act

October 29, 2010
My dreams for my children since they were in the womb have been that they would receive a good education and use their talents to be of service to humanity. So it came to be. They are now businessmen contributing to society with jobs and services that help grow our economy. They are husbands and good parents to their children. They volunteer at their kids’ school and the church. I can say that my dream became a reality. This is the same dream young mothers everywhere have for their children. Our children and young people are full of BIG dreams for their lives and the country they have known...
Luz Villafana's picture

Imagine Giving Birth While Shackled to a Bedpost

October 21, 2010
By Steph Drahan , National Women's Law Center Can you picture it? Neither can I. But for pregnant inmates in many states, this is how motherhood begins: with their legs shackled to metal hospital bedposts. For Shawanna Lumsey, this isn’t an exercise in imagination, but in fact her experience when delivering her son, Jordan. My name is Shawanna Lumsey and I was shackled when I gave birth to my son. I’ve made some mistakes in my life, but no expectant mother, no woman, no person should ever be treated the way I was. Eight years ago, I was convicted of credit card fraud and received a six-year...
Thao Nguyen's picture

One Way to Support the DREAM Act

August 11, 2010
(Pictured: Ivan Nikolov awaits deportation to Russia, even though he barely speaks the language and considers the United States his only home.) When I was at the Netroots Nation conference , I had the privilege of meeting the many young people who would be helped if Congress passed the DREAM Act , which would grant conditional temporary residency to undocumented college students. I met students like Matías Ramos, Prerna Lal, Lizbeth Mateo, and Yahaira Carrillo, who stood before Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid in quiet protest. They are all hardworking and high-achieving students who were...
Elisa Batista's picture

What Would Our Nation's Founders Say? Arizona, Human Rights, Children and Mothers

July 30, 2010
"All mothers want their children to live a better life than theirs; to give them the opportunity to fulfill their hopes and dreams. Throughout my childhood my mother worked countless double-shifts flipping burgers and scrubbing toilets at the local fast food joint. We never talked about the cockroach-ridden apartments or the yearning to see our family back in Colombia. Instead we smiled through the grit, the tears and the heartache. As the years passed, I realized our story was not unique. Thousands of immigrant mothers, for hundreds of years, endured what we had overcome for exactly the same...
Kristin's picture

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