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What the Government Shutdown Does to Women

October 11, 2013
The shutdown of the federal government is disastrous for millions of women, families, and households across America. A few examples: Almost 9 million mothers and children under five lost their vouchers for food, baby formula, and breastfeeding support under the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, known as WIC; Head Start and Early Head Start , which already lost 57,000 children due to the sequester cuts, has now lost another 19,000 children from the pre-school and child care program; Adult day care and child care centers run with federal funds have laid off...
Valerie Young's picture

Football, football, and more football...

October 7, 2013
Fall marks the beginning of football season, and fans come together to enjoy the thrill of watching their favorite teams battle it out on the field. There is no more popular sport in America, consistently the highest-rated on television and the first thing many of us look for in our local paper. However, an ongoing list of safety concerns spells trouble for the sport. Although all sports carry a risk of injury, football's violent nature and "gladiator" culture place it in a category of its own, especially regarding head trauma. The reality behind hits to the helmet is far more damaging than...
Nancy Correa's picture

Kids Before Corporations: Why Tax Reform Matters for Moms

September 25, 2013
Last week Sen. Carl Levin (D-MI) introduced the Stop Tax Haven Abuse Act, S. 1533. It might not seem obvious, but Sen. Levin’s bill, which would close corporate tax loopholes and eliminate incentives for shipping jobs and profits overseas, would be a HUGE help for families and children in America. You might be asking yourself: What do tax havens have to do with motherhood and raising a family? Fair question. When corporations hide their profits offshore and avoid paying their fair share of taxes struggling families have to pick up the bill. On top of buying school supplies, groceries and gas...
Margarida Jorge's picture

The Great Unshared Recovery: Millions of Us Are Worse Off Than in the Great Recession

September 22, 2013
Officially, the Great Recession ended in 2009. But after three years of “recovery,” there were 6.7 million more people living in poverty than in 2008, a recession year. We’ve been stuck with 15 percent of our people in poverty for three years. In the 2008 recession year, 13.2 percent were poor. Forty-six million poor people is a big and troubling number. But that is only part of the story of unshared recovery. More than one-third of us – 106 million people – are near poor, living one lay-off or health disaster away from very hard times. (For a family of four, if your income was below $23,492...
Debbie Weinstein's picture

Open Letter to President Obama — The One Book You Should Read on Public Education: Reign of Error, By Diane Ravitch

September 21, 2013
Dear President Obama, You must read Professor Diane Ravitch's latest book, Reign of Error: The Hoax of the Privatization Movement and the Danger to America's Public Schools . You won't like it. No one likes reading about their failures. And that's exactly WHY you should read it. Your legacy is at stake. You risk having Race to the Top known as Race to the Bank due to the enormous payday tech companies, "edupreneurs," and charter chain operators stand to pocket from taxpayer money that instead should go to educating the nation's children. The official flickr photostream of the White House,...
Cynthia Liu's picture

The Children Are Still Poor in America

September 18, 2013
Since the early part of the decade, the number of young children – those from birth to 5 years of age – living in poverty in the United States has been climbing. While that number held steady in 2012, according to data released today from the U.S. Census, the poverty report is far from good news. Our babies are still poor. Nearly 6 million young children—one in four children under the age of 6—live in poor households. The rate is higher yet for young Black children and young Hispanic children. What’s more, nearly half of young children live in low-income households that have to manage with...
Hannah Matthews's picture

Cost of College to Rise for Future Students (and Parents too)

September 4, 2013
The good news is that this summer, lawmakers from both sides of the aisle came together to pass legislation that lowers rates for students borrowing to pay for college this year. The bad news? The legislation will increase the cost of higher education for college students in the future . Back on July 1 the interest rate for new federal student loans doubled, jumping from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent. Student organizations and advocacy groups worked tirelessly to convince lawmakers to maintain the 3.4 percent rate. The legislation that ultimately passed did bring the rate back down—to 3.9...
Mattea Kramer's picture

TAKE ACTION: Chutes and Ladders comes to our Capitol!

September 3, 2013
It’s not easy to be heard in Washington, D.C., even about an issue as important as affordable, high-quality child care and preschool. There’s a lot of competition for our elected leaders’ attention: pinstripe-suited lobbyists, 24-hour news channels, and lots of partisan bickering. That’s why we’re getting creative, and we need your help to pull it off! We’re organizing moms and kids from across the country to play a GIANT (like 40-foot-wide) game of Chutes and Ladders on the grounds of the U.S. Capitol. We want your senators to play with us. Can you take two seconds and click a few buttons to...
Sarah Francis's picture

An Awesome Movie for Back-to-School

August 30, 2013
A Small Act, documenting a circle of lives impacted by global events and education, offers a perfect back-to-school movie.
Homa Tavangar's picture

What About Trayvon Martin's, Oscar Grant's and Marissa Alexander's Civil Rights?

August 27, 2013
According to Wikitionary, "civil rights" are personal liberties established by the 13th and 14th amendments to the U.S. Constitution. Our quest for civil rights started as a movement that began in the 1900s, which was primarily led by blacks in an effort to establish rights for individual black citizens. This process was long even though today some people still feel it is inconsequential. Thus, we continue our pursuit for justice and freedom. The civil rights movement cost a lot of lives, a lot of hardship, and a lot of grief. I understand that this movement, to some degree, has improved the...
Carrie Smith's picture

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