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Generation Zero—Why Millennials, And All of Us, Need Family-Friendly Laws

November 26, 2013
A survey of recent University of Pennsylvania Wharton School graduates reveals that many young adults are planning to solve the work/family crunch by removing family from the equation. Only 42% of the undergraduate class of 2012 plans to have children, compared to 78% of the class of 1992, according to research by Stewart Friedman, author of the new book, “Baby Bust.” Of course, this is only one privileged subset of the population. However, the overall American birthrate has recently declined as well to below the replacement rate (although it now appears to be stabilizing). Friedman reports...
Elizabeth Gedmark's picture

Goldman Sachs New 'Saturday' Rule is Beyond Ridiculous

November 18, 2013
What happens when Wall Street tries to give “flexibility” to their overworked employees? Something so ridiculous and astonishing, you’ll wonder if it’s straight out of the front page of The Onion . Something taken right from our speaking engagements when we give examples of the crazy things employers do to avoid getting clear about actual results. Last week Goldman Sachs announced a new “ Saturday Rule ” for junior bankers. The rule goes something like this: Get your butt out of the office by 9pm Friday night and don’t come back until 9am Sunday. Anyone caught working on Saturday, or...
Jody Thompson's picture

Kids? What Kids? A Working Woman's Bluff

November 11, 2013
At a recent business dinner, I was seated next to a woman who had founded a venture-backed startup. Her company was about four years old, and had raised tens of millions of dollars. I’m an editor-at-large for Inc and Inc.com. At Inc, we write about entrepreneurs, and about burnout. So I asked her, “We always hear that being an entrepreneur is a 24/7 endeavor. But you’ve been doing this for years, and no one can work all the time without burning out. What do you do to stay sane?” “I don’t know,” she said. “It’s funny. You just find a way to keep going.” At some point, I thought, everyone needs...
Kimberly Weisul's picture

Must Be Nice... Wish I Had a Kid

October 30, 2013
If you've not only heard about - but really thought about - the Family Friendly Workplace Ordinance that was just passed in San Francisco, you know what we're getting at with this title. If you're still celebrating the legislation that will go into effect on January 1, 2014, you may want to stop reading as we expose the plain truth that will cause your bubbly to go flat in about 3.5 seconds. We'll start at the top and say that the intent of the ordinance is ultimately good - to attract more families to the San Francisco area, keep them there, and make it less likely that these Californians...
Cali Ressler's picture

An Open Letter to the Employers of America

September 20, 2013
Listen-up employers of America…I’m going to give you five reasons why you should hire more of us – the women who want to work, yet need to be at school for pick-up at three o’clock.
CT Working Moms's picture

Author of "Maxed Out" talks about why American moms are on the brink

September 9, 2013
A few months ago, I received a note from a longtime friend, Joan Blades (co-founder of MomsRising ) introducing us to Katrina Alcorn . Joan thought we might support each others’ work, and it turns out that yes, supporting each others’ work was indeed a no brainer. I learned about the book Katrina was writing – Maxed Out: American Moms on the Brink – and it definitely sounded intriguing. After all, I’m an American Mom and before ROWE, I definitely would have described myself as being on the brink of many things…insanity being one of them. When I received my advance copy of the book, I was...
Cali Ressler's picture

When Opting Out Doesn't Work, and Leaning In Makes You Nuts

September 5, 2013
Ten years ago, a group of high-powered women quit their jobs to stay home with their kids full-time. They got tons of media attention, including a segment on 60 Minutes . Writer Judith Warner recently caught up with them in a cover story for The New York Times magazine. The story didn’t look at the happily-ever-afters -- the women who are still pleased to be at home full-time. Perhaps there weren’t any, and at any rate, there’s not much drama there. Instead, the story focused on women who now wanted a full-time job and were unable to find one that suited them. The story talked at length about...
Kimberly Weisul's picture

Tips on How to Join a MomsRising Tweetchat

August 30, 2013
What is a MomsRising Tweetchat? MomsRising tweetchats are opportunities to discuss core issue areas related to the economic security and well being of moms and families (like healthcare or food justice) by using a subject specific hashtag. We invite experts in the field to answer member questions, share the latest resources, and invite members to discuss their own views on the topics. The various issue areas have their own time slots and often repeat weekly at a pre-determined time, but sometimes we may have special issue tweetchats on other days that we advertise in advance. Joining our...
Nina Perez's picture

Planning a Career Break? Make Sure It’s a Pause, Not a Dent

August 16, 2013
A decade ago, Lisa Belkin wrote “ The Opt Out Revolution ,” a New York Times Magazine piece that became instantly famous. It profiled women who had chosen to leave high-profile careers to stay home full-time, arguing that they had opted out because (to quote one) “women’s brains light up differently.” I subsequently wrote a report documenting that the print media in general, and The New York Times in particular, had been writing precisely this story since the 1970s, announcing over and over again that women had finally discovered that they wanted to stay home rather than work. Some outlets...
Joan C. Williams's picture

To Support Breastfeeding, Paid Family and Medical Leave is Crucial

August 15, 2013
Having the time to bond with a new baby is crucial for many reasons. One reason why those first weeks after a baby is born are so vital is the importance of the breastfeeding relationship. However, for many mothers, that relationship is soon disrupted – as many as a quarter of mothers return to work less than 10 days after the birth of their child, and half are back at work within 40 days . Breastfeeding can and does continue once women return to work – the new federal healthcare law is helping to ensure that employers provide the accommodations that breastfeeding moms need. But to get off to...
Liz Ben-Ishai's picture

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